Tag Archives: Recycling

From Treehugger: Frugal Green Living Posters

Canning, victory gardening, carpooling, conserving resources, living frugally — There are a lot of parallels between a whole swath of trends and activities today and those from the 1940s. In both periods, outside forces (war, the economy, the environment) have caused a lot of us to take stock and change some of our homefront habits. In the process, many of us discovered or rediscovered some relatively lost arts on the way to using less.

The always-relevant Treehugger has offered a terrific blog post, Frugal Green Living: Posters for the Movement, which features a collection of 1940s posters that, while making statements urging people to reconsider wasteful habits, are also themselves wonderful examples of message-oriented graphic design at its mid-century zenith.

I love these for their bold graphics and nostalgic style and marvel that they are fairly relevant today – except for the last one, of course. Though Treehugger makes the point that cooking fat is now collected for biodiesel fuel, rather than to make explosives. And that is undoubtedly a good thing.

Posters: Minneapolis Public Library

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Flashy but Trashy Fashion Show and other ways to help the planet on Earth Day

Residents of the small Canadian town of Fernie, B.C., will mark this Thursday’s 40th anniversary of Earth Day with their 4th annual Flashy but Trashy Fashion Show. The show highlights people of all ages from the community who demonstrate their flair for creative re-use by modeling outfits made of such materials as biodegradable packing peanuts, coffee filters, flour sacs, and bubble wrap.

See a video from last year’s Flashy but Trashy show.

Displays of creative re-use are fun for both the participant and the viewer. Last year my daughter and her friends took part in a local Eco-Fashion show, at which they modeled their hand-made creations, all of which were made using re-purposed materials.

When Earth Day began in 1970, it heralded a new era of thinking about conservation of our land, air, water and other resources. At the U.S. government level, it sparked the Environmental Protection Agency, the Clean Air Act and the Clean Water Act. On a personal level, many people began caring for the planet in a variety of ways they hadn’t before.

Take just one area: paper recycling. Between 1960 and 2006 paper and paperboard recycling rates have increased from 17% to more than 50%, according to the Environmental Protection Agency, which offers this information about how to reduce, re-use and recycle various materials.

Here are more recycling statistics from around the world.

Here is a map of Earth Day events around the world.

Last but not least, with a nod to the folks in Fernie, this is a picture of me in 1987, wearing a dress created from recycled play money and ready to hit the eco-town.

Video: Beyond Recycling, Photos: Susan Sachs Lipman, Los Angeles Times Magazine

Slow News Day: San Francisco Passes Ambitious Recycling & Sustainable Food Laws

Real_Compost2

San Franciscans, you could be forgiven if you’ve been out playing in our unusually beautiful weather and missed a couple of developments that contribute to San Francisco being one of the greenest cities in the country.

Late last month, San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom announced and signed the nation’s first mandatory composting law and what is probably its most comprehensive recycling law.

According to Mayor Newsom, San Francisco is already keeping 72 percent of recyclable material out of our landfill. The city has a Zero Waste goal.

The Huffington Post ran a very good piece on the program and the announcement.

The sfenvironment site is an excellent resource for information about the city’s green programs and ways you can be involved.

If that wasn’t enough, a few days ago, Mayor Newsom issued a multi-pronged Executive Directive that aims to get San Franciscans even closer to complete sustainability in the areas of producing and consuming local, nutritious food, and doing so in a way that limits the impact on the environment, while meeting the needs of the most vulnerable San Franciscans.

Mayor Newsom announced the Directive at Oakland’s non-profit City Slicker Farms, which itself was converted from a former junkyard. San Francisco’s plan calls for similar re-use of land.

The Civil Eats blog has this very thorough story.

Another piece on the Directive appears in the San Francisco Chronicle.

I’m sure lots of other cities are creating initiatives to promote greener, more sustainable practices. If you come across any Slow News in your city or town, please send it my way.